ProductDetails

  • 01. Baby You Can Do It
    02. Hot Like Fire
    03. I Feel So Good
    04. Rock You Baby
    05. We Are One
    06. Africa Must Be Free
    cover

    TONY IGIETTEMO

    Hot Like Fire

    [engl] Leaning against a wall, his shirt unbuttoned to his navel and cradling a tumbler of something strong and sophisticated, Tony Igiettemo looks every bit the smooth talking 80s gent. When you put Hot Like Fire on the turntable and drop the needle, however, it is immediately clear that Smooth Tony is also a little bit freaky. Sirens, slap bass, squelchy synths and a titchy high hat that just won't give up, Hot Like Fire is a cosmic call from a dance floor on the far side of the universe. Produced by John Malife – the go-to man in Nigeria when you wanted your funk freaky – it's driven by a heavy low end that compels you to move. 'Baby You Can Do It' is Boney M's 'Daddy Cool' via a sweaty Nigerian dance floor. 'I Feel So Good' has a Kool & The Gang vibe, albeit with a freaky, warbling synth. And 'Hot Like Fire' is a strange reggae/funk fusion, fuelled by the righteous herb. 'We Are One' and 'Africa Must Unite', meanwhile, are post-disco, reggae-tinged calls for African Unity. 'Rock Your Baby' is the album's most relentless dance floor banger and sums up its ethos best. Clap your hands everybody and get down on it. Tony Igiettomo is here to make your body move. - Peter Moore
    Format
    LP
    Release-Datum
    11.05.2017
    EAN
    EAN 0710473190725
    Format
    CD
    Release-Datum
    11.05.2017
    EAN
    EAN 0710473190992
     

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